Why Receive Stomach Massage?

Stomach massage is highly underrated; most clients that I work on have never received it or even heard of it. I believe this area of the body isn’t talked about enough, and I’m here to teach you the benefits! The positive effects of treating the abdomen can include an emotional release, a decrease in overall tension, and regulation of bowel movements. Some things to consider before experiencing abdomen massage would be if you are pregnant or have previous stomach problems. You may want to talk with your doctor to get cleared for this type of therapeutic work.

Emotional release can be described as a rush of emotion, usually when receiving massage or another form of bodywork. These releases are powerful and show up in different ways, depending on the person. Emotional energy can get stored in spaces that we normally wouldn’t pay any mind to. When we start paying attention to these areas, your body can release that emotion and even let go of stored up tension. For some, these emotions look like grief, fear, and sadness. These sessions can sometimes result in tears or sadness, while others experience overwhelming happiness or laughter. Understanding why this works is a key component in the equation. Body memory is a term used to describe the reason for why this works. Just as a certain smell can bring back a vivid memory, touch can do so as well. Garrett Curler goes further in depth on this subject in his blog linked below.

https://elementsmassage.com/elm-grove/blog/massage-and-emotional-release#:~:text=The%20short%20explanation%20for%20emotional,be%20familiar%20with%20body%20memory.

The biggest benefit you may receive from stomach massage is improved digestive function. There are specific massage movements designed to help with indigestion and constipation. You can perform these movements on yourself or have a massage therapist do them for you. Tiffany Ayuda mentions a few movements you can perform before a meal at the end of her article. The video linked at the end of this blog is a short “how to” for at-home relief. It explains how to clear your ascending, transverse, and descending colon. I have taught many clients and friends this technique for when they need relief at home, and they have all reported great results!

Some key rules to keep in mind:

1.       Always massage clockwise to relieve constipation.

2.       Massage counterclockwise to slow down or regulate bowel movements.

3.       Talk to a doctor if massage movements don’t help your symptoms.

Next time you receive a massage, ask if your LMT will perform stomach massage! It may be a bit uncomfortable at first, but eventually you won’t want to receive a massage without incorporating stomach work. Stay in communication with your therapist about how you’re doing, and remember to first be cleared by your doctor for stomach massage if you are pregnant or have pre-existing stomach problems.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEY7ur6x80o

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.